Maps

The maps are made from Birch treated with a special UV coating; the multiple water layers are Aspen treated with a stain that protects the layers while giving a sense of depth to the whole map.

Category: Maps

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While Geographic Information Systems answers the “what” and “where” of locations, Geographic Information Science is concerned with the “how”. … It encompasses all aspects of GIS such as remote sensing, surveying, mathematics, programming and geography.

This is an important distinction. The science is based on data collected and shared in a meaningful way in order to provide accurate assessments and analytical solutions. We make maps from data; nothing is traced or copied from other maps.

Category: Maps

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Cartography is the study and practice of making maps. Combining science, aesthetics, and technique, cartography builds on the premise that reality can be modeled in ways that communicate spatial information effectively.

Without maps, we would be “spatially blind.” Knowledge about spatial relations and location of objects are most important to learn about space, to act in space, to be aware of what is where and what is around us, or simply to be able to make good decisions. Maps can be derived automatically from geodata acquisition methods, such as laser scanning, remote sensing, or sensor networks. Smart models of geodata can be built allowing in-depth analysis of structures and patterns. A whole range of presentation forms are available nowadays, from maps on mobile phones all the way to geoinformation presented as augmented reality presentations or on wooden charts like we build.

credit Georg Gartner – He serves as president of the International Cartographic Association.

Category: Maps

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The numbers represent depth data at that specific point. We also include shipwrecks, sea grasses, navigation channels, spoil areas where dredging the Intracoastals and other channels are placed. The spoils actually get filled up toward the surface. The designation of their area is for navigation warning – it does not mean the whole area is full. It simply denotes the allowed area for the dredge. We show them reversed to point out the borders.

This data is collected from multiple sources including local captains, NOAA, USGS, US Coast Guard, CIA World Databank, Army Corps of Engineers, National Geophysical Data Center, the Environmental Protection Agency and each state’s and county’s GIS divisions.

Category: Maps

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The colors that go from light to dark represent the depth of the water in a meaningful way that helps us perceive depth. The USGS and NOAA have a series of color charts that have been adopted as part of the metadata used. From the cartography perspective, we like to adjust contours to whatever scale the map is presented. If it makes sense to do 3′ 6′ 9′ 12′ or whatever we choose, we control the representation. Using depth data and our GIS we can make them any way we’d like. No map tracings of any sort – ever.

Category: Maps

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We recommend keeping them in a humidity controlled area within reason. Outdoor placement is not a good idea. The sun will also seriously fade the maps over time if they have direct exposure. UV coated windows help tremendously but be careful where you place them.

Category: Maps

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Sure, we do it all the time. Our maps are made from a cartographic perspective of a “presentation” piece. The top area includes a few parts of the legend that matter, like title and sub-title, scale, projection, nautical or regular miles as well as a compass rose. In addition, some graphic elements can be changed to include a family crest, wedding date, or company logo. We also offer a star or heart to pinpoint your preferred location if you’d like.

If you need customization, just reach out to us in our contact form and we will get back to you.

Category: Maps

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With two to thirteen layers of wood glued together it’s important that the wood is allowed to “breathe”. In humid environments it will break down over time if there is little air access. When we hang one of the maps in a public place we use standoffs around the frame and leave a 1/4″ gap for air to flow when the Plexiglas is used.

The glass also obscures the 3D effect somewhat and depending on the lighting in the room, it can also cause refracting of the light.

Category: Maps

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